Ezekiel - Chapter 19

Ezekiel 19

Uh oh, poetry (sorry Paul :-P). I find Biblical poetry like this more challenging to read. I wonder what is it supposed to mean? What am I supposed to get from it? The same s true here. I get to the end of the chapter, and I'm left wondering. Sigh.

It seems to be the Lord comparing the princes of Israel to first lion cubs gone astray and then comparing their mother to a vine. Who is He referring to, their mother? In the first, destruction comes on the princes, in the second destruction comes on the mother. I'm not sure what that means. Nonetheless, it's sad for the Lord to see this destruction, even if it is deserved.

I wonder how much of creation, perhaps all of it, exists simply to give God illustrations of His ways? Certainly that's not the only reason, I believe it was given for our pleasure as well. In Romans 1 we see that God's nature is made known through creation and over and over God uses illustrations from His creation to make a point about our hearts and our actions throughout the Bible.

I see God's nature in so much of His world. Over and over, I learn things about creation and I'm reminded of who God. The passing of the seasons speak to His grace and forgiveness, for example. If we put the Bible together with creation, I think what God is becomes very plain. Looking, however, at nature with out the Bible or at the Bible without nature, I believe that we can get an incomplete view of our God. He reveals Himself to us through both.

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The two lions represent Jehoahaz and Jehoiakim (2 Chron 36). I think the vine in the second parable represents Jerusalem. It helps to study the contemporary parts of Kings / Chronicles when studying the prophets, to keep things straight. And a good commentary is indispensable.

Uh oh, poetry (sorry Paul :-P).

Dude, it's totally Cool; like Alan says, a good commentary is indispensable. It takes serious effort to understand these things. Not only does much of this type of writing apply to their current situation, but it usually has an ambiguous double entendre in prophecy for the future.



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  • Uh oh, poetry (sorry Paul :-P). Dude, it's totally Cool; like Alan says, a good commentary is indispensable. It takes serious effort to understand these things. Not only does much of this type of writing apply to thei...

    P. Allan Frederick
    Ezekiel - Chapter 19
  • The two lions represent Jehoahaz and Jehoiakim (2 Chron 36). I think the vine in the second parable represents Jerusalem. It helps to study the contemporary parts of Kings / Chronicles when studying the prophets, to ke...

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