Romans 14

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This may be one of the most ignored and most abused passages in scripture. Ignored by those who are mature so that they can continue to look down on, criticize and ridicule those who are not, and abused by the immature to force the mature to stoop to their level.

The mature ignore it because they would have to swallow their pride and their greater understanding of 'freedom in Christ' for the sake of their brother. They are right, not just in their own mind, but this passage implies that they do have a greater and deeper understanding of God's plan and heart. But they ignore this passage, written primarily to them, warning them not to use their greater understanding too freely. Consider this paraphrase of the ESV version of Romans 14:15:

For if your brother is grieved by what you [do], you are no longer walking in love. By what you [do], do not destroy the one for whom Christ died.
So, for those with a more enlightened, perhaps more liberal, view of things, are you willing to give up that view for your weaker brother?

The immature abuse this passage by placing them in the seat of protection and throwing Romans 14 in the face of those with more liberal interpretations. "You need to accept me on this because of Romans 14!" They fail to recognize that they've just labeled themselves as "the one who is weak in faith". In doing so, do they seek deeper understanding form those who are stronger or more mature? Do they seek to grow? No, it is frequently used to entrench their position and to guarantee it's acceptance as valid & right. (Ironically, by putting themselves in the 'weaker' position in this passage, aren't they essentially admitting that they are wrong?) They do not seek to accept those who's faith is stronger or to grow in their own. They seem to say "I'm weak, I'm staying that way, and you need to deal with it." So, to those who are weak, or perhaps more conservative, are you willing to admit that you may have something to learn from the more liberal among us?

We are to welcome those who's faith is weak and requires external things to hold it up - like special days, abstinence from certain foods and other rules and regulations. There is no exception, no circumstance for not welcoming them. This is hard, because you and I can start talking about things that we think are big enough to say something like "Well, that now falls outside of Christianity." Maybe so, but that is for God to decide not us. We can discuss and debate if we like. We may even feel that the person has crossed the boundary of Christianity into something else, but we are told to 'welcome him'.

Are we doing so with each other within our own narrow fellowship? Think about issues like dating outside the church, giving levels, the level of importance assigned to evangelism, attendance expectations, Kip & Portland or even, dare I say, signing agreements. If we cannot respectfully welcome each other on these things, still welcoming each other, what hope is there for our relationship with the other COC's? If you're not in the ICOC, what about your tribe, be it COC, Baptist, Catholic, etc.

Usually my QT notes aren't' so 'preachy', but this is one of modern, divided Christianity's biggest downfalls, in my view. And I am not exempt. Recently, my brother Clarke posted here about the call of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) for 10,000 disciples to pray for their fellowship. Clarke (not a member of a Disciples of Christ church) challenged "every COC, ICOC, and ICC blogger to sign up, commit to pray, and advertise the program on their blogs." I followed the link and found that their "General Minister and President" was a woman, which gave me pause. Based on my understanding of scripture, I don't believe that women should be ministers or in positions of authority, so I was hesitant to sign up for this. But Clarke and my friend Alan who have indicated that they feel the same way, have signed up, seemingly without hesitation. I am not being asked to validate their doctrine, but simply to pray for them. Why should that be hard to stomach? It should not, but it is. Even as I type this, I know that I ought to go, sign up and give them my heart, yet I remain hesitant. God help my prideful, judgmental heart!. I will commit to praying for these brothers and sisters.

As long as we refuse to accept those who's faith requires more rules and regulations or those who have a more liberal view, Christianity will remain deeply divided and each particular group will remain entrenched in the safety of their own convictions. And we will be no different than the world. And we will not grow.

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I think the gist of Romans 14 is that if you are a child of God then what else matters. Why bring divisions among you with things that have no concrete relevance to your salavation? The trouble is that our pride wants to believe we're special because of something we do. I go to so and so church. I fast once a week. I pray every morning. I share my faith. I have someone that holds me accountable. I give so much money to church and charity. On and On we want to think we're bettter than others because of anything we can come up with. I think part of it is pride pride in the form of looking down on others to make ourselves feel better because we're not happy. So when Paul says in verse "17For the kingdom of God is not a matter of eating and drinking, but of righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy Spirit," He's reaffirming it's not about judging but peace and joy.

For me the passage flows and makes sense and I start getting this just let it go/freedom in Christ feeling and then he put in verse "22b Blessed is the man who does not condemn himself by what he approves." You still have to blow the trumpet when it affects salvation.

Hey Doug,

I love this passage of scripture. I think it holds an important key to unity in the church.

In a sense, both people are the weaker brother. Neither has anything more than human judgment to tell him what is right. Humility demands that each person should say to himself "...but I may be wrong." If we could only do that, in sincerity, we could learn to accept one another even when we believe a the other person is wrong about something. God is able to make him stand, and will do so. Just like he'll make me stand despite my sins and my lack of understanding.

Alan

Thoughtful exegesis, Doug!

My feeling is that if someone can quote Romans 14 against someone else, he/she is not a "weak" sibling in Christ at all! Rather, she/he is a well-studied though self-minded one who wants her/his own way and is actually trying to strong-arm the one whose views diverge.

There is room for conscience in Christianity.

I can see where Roman Christians who grew up Jewish would be offended by the practices in question - to the point of vegetarianism. I can see where Roman Christians who grew up pagan would see those cautions as peculiar.

What troubles me is that the council at Jerusalem (Acts 15) ruled against the practices of eating meats (with blood in them and sacrificed to idols) and porneia. While Paul doesn't forbid the former, he forbids the latter strongly.

And I come back to the proscription that James and the council sent out which said "It seemed good to the Holy Spirit and to us .... Here is a matter on which a (probably) all-Jewish council has made a ruling and the Holy Spirit's support sounds tepid. Paul speaks from the field, where the action is; where Jewish and Gentile Christians eat at the same tables - and he seems to say something different. Is there conflict here? Who's right?

Isn't the conclusion that some things are just a matter of conscience, not of law, in Christ?



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  • Thoughtful exegesis, Doug! My feeling is that if someone can quote Romans 14 against someone else, he/she is not a "weak" sibling in Christ at all! Rather, she/he is a well-studied though self-minded one who wants her/h...

    Keith Brenton
    Romans 14
  • Hey Doug, I love this passage of scripture. I think it holds an important key to unity in the church. In a sense, both people are the weaker brother. Neither has anything more than human judgment to tell him what i...

  • I think the gist of Romans 14 is that if you are a child of God then what else matters. Why bring divisions among you with things that have no concrete relevance to your salavation? The trouble is that our pride wants ...

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